Sunday, March 6, 2005

The problem with vacuuming

I've had a persistent problem with vacuuming in every place I've lived except UNL: it has a tendency to throw the circuitbreaker / fusebox. This happened in the home I grew up in, my parents' current home, my apartment two summers ago when I was an intern, and my current place. It's happened at least a couple times when I've been at other peoples' houses too. Why is this still a problem?

I don't know enough about electricity to know whether the problem really lies in the vacuums or the electrical systems, but it drives me crazy. Surely I can't be the only person who observes this. It can't help that I've got quite a bit of equipment all plugged into a couple outlets all connected to the same breaker switch; at least I've got UPSes on everything so that when I do lose power, the computer stays on and online. But, this is stupid. Whatever the problem is, someone who knows what it is should work something out. Are current homes just not set up for the kind of electrical demands we're putting on them? This apartment is the newest single residence I've lived in, at about twenty years old. Do people living in twenty-first century homes not have to deal with this crap?

11 comments:

Matthew Beermann said...

Just turn things off first. Sheesh. :) Actually, Neihardt did the same thing at UNL, but perhaps you never had to live there...

Travis said...

I'm not going to turn my computer off to vacuum. That's ridiculous. If I remember, I do try to turn off my speakers and sub before I vacuum, because I imagine they use a rather absurd amount of power. (Again, I don't really know enough electricity terminology here to sound educated.) I did live in Neihardt for a year, and I remember a few weird power issues, but I don't know if any of them were related to vacuuming. Perhaps they were.

Anonymous said...

You should get a roomba! Then you wouldn't have to actually spend your time vacuuming, you could amuse yourself by watching a robot run into things around your apartment while cleaning at the same time and not being plugged into the wall.
-- Sarah

Travis said...

I've thought about it, but I don't think that the inconvenience of vacuuming is worth that much money to me. Yet.

Anonymous said...

$150 is not that much

Travis said...

And vacuuming isn't that hard.

Matthew Brand said...

But I think it would fit you so well. I can see it now, you slaving over the hot stove, the roomba comes in and you say "Hi Roomba." You then take the marinara sauce you've been working on off the stove but you trip over the roomba. You fall down and are knocked unconscious and marinara is everywhere. A friend comes over and sees you on the ground and mistakes the marinara for blood. In an effort to try to get blood back in you they slit their own wrists (type O- so they can give to anyone) and start dripping their blood all over you since they can't tell where your wound is. You then awake to the quite noise of the roomba vacuuming up the massive amounts of blood and marinara. Slowly regaining consciousness you tell it "good work" as you slowly unzip your pants to have your way with your recently deceased friend.

Travis said...

Yeah, that's really the only reason that I'd want to get a Roomba. But how do you explain that to the salesperson?

Anonymous said...

Your parents must be poor. I have never had that problem.

Travis said...

Well, yeah, they are. But, I've seen the problem elsewhere (such as at my grandparents' and friends' houses), I have a nice vacuum, and I pay $1125 a month for my place, and I still get the same problem.

daren sammy said...

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