Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Hot water

The water available to me at work comes in three temperatures: sort of cold, lukewarm, and molten lava hot.  I've been drinking tea a couple times a day recently, so I've been using the molten lava hot water to brew.  The unfotunate side effect is that the water comes out so hot that I nearly burn my hands through the cup and the cardboard safety sleeve, so the tea sits on my desk for a period of time.  This is annoying for two reasons: first, that I went to go get something to drink because I was thirsty, and now I have to wait to drink it if I want to be able to taste things for the next week, and second, that by the time the water has cooled down to a drinkable point, I've stopped checking it frequently enough, and now it's lukewarm.  Tea is delicious mildly hot, and ice cold.  In-between is rather sad.  I like that there are about a dozen different types of tea I can choose from at work, but I don't really like that it always ends up poorly for those reasons.  I think I'll go back to water and Diet Coke.  (I've recently been trying to phase in a little more Diet Coke than one a day, and it seems to not be affecting me.  It's nice, because plain water is driving me mad.)

4 comments:

Jordan said...

I usually grab one of the plastic lids and fill it with ice. Brew my tea, then add the ice to cool it down and put the lid on.

Travis said...

Hmmm, up here in Redmond we can't afford ice, it seems.

Andy M said...

And therein lay the paradox of tea: it only brews right if you use the lava water. You can brew at double strength and then ice it, or wait for it to cool down... Jordan took the words out of my mouth.

Maybe you could brew it double-strength and then add the lukewarm water?

Travis said...

At home, I do brew tea at double strength and then mix it with cool water. It comes out the perfect warm temperature for drinking. After the first cup (or two if I'm feeling like it), I put it in the fridge, and then by the time I get my next cup, it's usually the perfect cold temperature. Unfortunately, that's not very convenient at work.